3 Things I Wish I Learned in College

3 Things I Wish I Learned in College

With graduation just a few months away, seniors will be taking that first giant step into adulthood. Has their time at college prepared them to tackle the real world? Before students dive deep into their area of concentration after their sophomore year, they take all those prerequisites. This usually involves walking around a track for exercise

With graduation just a few months away, seniors will be taking that first giant step into adulthood. Has their time at college prepared them to tackle the real world? Before students dive deep into their area of concentration after their sophomore year, they take all those prerequisites. This usually involves walking around a track for exercise science credits and learning about Alexander the Great in World History. These 101-level classes may be an easy pass to put a nice cushion on GPAs, but do they really help in the long run?

When I graduated, I got a job through a friend within a month and started my professional career. As years went on, I had to learn on the fly with a lot of life choices. Maybe a little preparation during my educational years would’ve helped. Here are three things I wish I learned during my undergrad days:

How to do taxes

Taxes aren’t fun, but it’s a part of life. Our parents claimed us dependents for years on their forms, but once you’re on your own, it’s time to crunch those numbers. Understanding the basics of filling out a tax form, the resources you can tap into, what can get written off and what can’t, and knowing what all those form numbers mean are just steps in the right direction for completing your taxes before the dreaded April 15 deadline.

Establishing credit

Between 2004 and 2014, there has been a 56% jump in student loan debt, with the average student carrying just under $29,000 on their shoulders when they throw their mortarboard in the air. Economics classes were okay when you learned how to balance with book with the credit and debit columns. With already having debt under their name when leaving college, credit becomes an important factor for the rest of your life. Everything from getting a new car to buying a house relies on your credit history. Spending more time on learning proper money management at a personal level would’ve helped out.

Preparing for job interviews

Most universities have career services that can look over a resume and offer some suggestions in editing, but that’s not adequate when it comes to real life. You end up fighting for meeting times with all the other students during business hours to meet with someone just to look over a resume. If the purpose of going to college is to make you more productive and a viable candidate in a tough job market, maybe offering classes modeled around mock interviews and resume building is something that should be embedded in more curriculums early on.

 

Bob Hagh
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